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Get authentic recipes and stories from around the globe.

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  • 07/20/13--18:26: Local Boy Makes Good
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><small><b>From SAVEUR Issue #158</b></small><br>This past December at the Grey Plume in Omaha, chef-owner Clayton Chapman set his <em>mise en place</em> in front of me. It was a thing to behold. Diverse and vibrant with all sorts of Midwest fruits and vegetables, it contained the building blocks for the dishes I would eat for dinner: delicate buttermilk gnocchi topped with caramelized Bartlett pears, preserved lemon peel, micro basil, and tart tomato powder; a pizzette chockablock with shiitake mushrooms, cold-smoked cauliflower, pickled ramps, persimmons, and local honey; and a colorful salad of finely shaved beets, watermelon radishes, turnips, and carrot and celery curls. Fantastic. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/Grey-Plume-Omaha">Keep reading &raquo;</a></em>

        

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  • 07/20/13--18:35: Bohemian Rhapsody
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><small><b>From SAVEUR Issue #158</b></small><br>When I came to Nebraska 25 years ago to teach at the university in Lincoln, I visited Omaha, an hour away, and discovered the Bohemian Cafe, founded there in 1924. With its folkloric d&eacute;cor and waitresses in lace-edged <em>kroje</em>, it reminded me of the old country. Its foods&mdash;rich duck liver dumpling soup; <em>svickova</em>, sauerbraten enriched with sour cream; sweet and sour cabbage; <em>kolaches</em>, pastries with poppyseed, Bavarian cream, prune, cherry, and other fruit centers&mdash;were like the dishes my grandmothers prepared for Sunday family gatherings in Prague, where I grew up. I left there in 1968 when I was 20. But at the Bohemian Cafe, I felt right back at home. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/Nebraska-Czech-Food">Keep reading &raquo;</a></em>

        

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  • 07/22/13--08:30: The World on a Grill
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><small><b>From SAVEUR Issue #157</b></small><br>While writing my book <em>Planet Barbecue!</em> (Workman, 2010) I traveled across six continents (I skipped Antarctica, though scientists there grill, too) and 53 countries in search of the best flame-cooked foods on earth. Here, in no particular order, are my 12 favorite grill joints in the world. <a href="http://www.saveur.com/gallery/The-World-on-a-Grill"><em>See the restaurants in the gallery &raquo;</em></a>

        

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  • 07/23/13--08:30: Keepers of the Flame
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><small><b>From SAVEUR Issue #157</b></small><br>In the vast kitchen of &#304;mam &Ccedil;a&#287;da, a kebab restaurant in the southern Turkish city of Gaziantep, Burhan &Ccedil;ada&#351;, the 51-year-old owner, looked on as his staff of 20 labored in perfect harmony. At one counter, a crew worked ground meat and eggplant onto metal skewers. Another cadre stood at a long grill, deftly rotating skewers of various meats and vegetables over glowing oak charcoal. In a corner, a half dozen men reduced cuts of lamb to a fine crimson paste with scimitar-like blades known as <em>z&#305;rh</em>, their rhythmic chopping reverberating like thunder. Hand chopping, explained Burhan, gives his cooks complete control over the texture of the meat, which should hold together on the skewer but crumble under the fork. Besides, he said, "Meat ground by machine has no soul."
    <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/Keepers-of-the-Flame">Keep reading &raquo;</a></em>

        

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  • 07/24/13--21:00: Scenes from Route 66
  • Colorful eateries and culinary charms abound along Route 66, America's most iconic thoroughfare. For more about Route 66, see Jane and Michael Stern's article Glory Road, from our August/September 2013 special issue on America's Heartland.
        

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  • 07/29/13--08:30: Hearts and Minds
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><small><b>From SAVEUR Issue #157</b></small><br>I landed in Kuwait on February 28, 2003, less than a month after my 19th birthday, as a private first class with the rest of the 101st Airborne Division. Two years earlier, after an aimless semester of college during which the Twin Towers fell, I'd filled out the information request form on GoArmy.com, looking for some direction in my life. I was thrilled when we were deployed to Iraq. It felt like my chance to do something important. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travel/hearts-and-minds">Keep reading &raquo;</a></em>

        

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    <!--smart_paging_filter-->The Spanish charcuterie board is a thing of porky magnificence: from the omnipresent <em>chorizo</em>, to the sweet and soft <em>butifarra</em>, to that king of hams, the rare and pricey <em>jam&oacute;n ib&eacute;rico de bellota</em>, the sausages and cured meats that the country produces are a testament to the edible magic that results when a pig meets spices and a little bit of curing time. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/Travels/A-Guide-to-Spanish-Cured-Meats">See the full photo gallery &raquo;</a></em>

        

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    <!--smart_paging_filter--><big><b>Wheat and corn and incomparable beef, wild berries baked into the most luscious desserts, crisp summer salads, and the best fried chicken and chili imaginable&mdash;the southern Great Plains is a fantastic place to eat. Here, on flatlands teeming with life, farmers and ranchers, foragers and chefs pass down cherished recipes and share new additions to the region's rich culinary heritage.

        

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  • 08/05/13--00:30: Oklahoma Rising
  • Ludovine's restaurant, Oklahoma City-photo
    by Karen Shimizu

    At first glance, Oklahoma City's Ludivine appears to serve the type of familiar rib-sticking French bistro fare that sends diners all over America into food-induced comas: split beef bones with molten marrow and tomato jam; a croque tartine, a monster of a sandwich heavy with ham, béchamel sauce, and bubbling cheese, topped with a fried egg. But the side salad for that croque is made with foraged dock and chickweed, which lend a refreshing bittersweet crunch. It's just one hint that this place is more complex than you might think. Jonathon Stranger and Russ Parsons, the young chefs and co-owners of Ludivine, are both Oklahoma City natives who left home to work under top chefs like Jean-Georges Vongerichten and David Burke. Pulled back by a desire to engage with the agricultural heritage of their hometown, they returned and opened this restaurant in 2010. Their cooking showcases Oklahoma sourcing at its best, from farm-raised Mangalitsa pork and bison to the same native plants that sustained the Choctaw tribe, the area's first settlers. (The chefs consulted Choctaw experts in medicinal and edible plants during the restaurant's development.) The resulting menu might feature warm cocottes of sausage-Camembert spoon pudding topped with a dollop of melting crème fraîche, a juicy bone-in pork chop with charred wild greens, a bowl of smoked tomato soup with a baguette slice slathered with a pungent pesto of butter and wild garlic, or bison tartare over lobster mushrooms and sweet corn. It's a celebration of Oklahoma like none we've ever tasted.

    Ludivine
    805 N. Hudson Avenue, Oklahoma City
    405/778-6800
        

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  • 08/05/13--08:30: Bountiful Prairie
  • <!--smart_paging_filter-->The United States could be said to have a heart of flatness. What else is there in the southern Great Plains of Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma besides a flatness bigger than France, bigger than Spain, nearly as big as two Germanys&mdash;almost a quarter million square miles of big, flat stability?
    <br><br>
    Actually, if you know how to look at it, there's a lot here besides the flatness. For one thing, there's plenty to eat. Ask knowledgeable chefs in the southern Great Plains, and they'll tell you about ramps growing wild; porcinis and meaty oyster mushrooms sprouting on logs; quail nesting in sand plum thickets heavy with sweet-tart fruit; wild peaches, passion fruit, and puckery aronia berries that get dried and ground for seasoning meat. Even the cattails conceal treasures; some Choctaw Indians have taught chefs how to knock the tiny seeds from ripe cattail heads to use for flour. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/Travels/Bountiful-Prairie">Keep reading &raquo;</a></em>

        

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    Amsterdam Travel Sketchbook-photo This week's installment of Recipe Comix is really more of an episode of Travel Comix, as cartoonist Lucy Knisley (previously in this space paying tribute to the delicious pairing of donuts and coffee) shares part of the story of a recent trip she took to Amsterdam. While there, she spent a majority of her time on two wheels exploring the city's stunning art scene and shops-including one that specializes in toothbrushes-and indulging in plenty of amazing local eats, from falafel to stroopwafel to potato sorbet.

    Lucy Knisely for SAVEUR



    See previous weeks' Recipe Comix in the archive »

    Lucy Knisley is a New York-based illustrator, comic artist, author, and occasional puppeteer and food and travel writer. She is the author of the drawn journal French Milk; you can learn more about her at LucyKnisley.com
        



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  • 08/05/13--09:30: Amsterdam Travel Sketchbook
  • <!--smart_paging_filter-->This week's installment of Recipe Comix is really more of an episode of Travel Comix, as cartoonist <b>Lucy Knisley</b> (previously in this space paying tribute to the delicious pairing of <a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/Comix/Recipe-Comix-Donuts--Coffee">donuts and coffee</a>) shares part of the story of a recent trip she took to Amsterdam, where she spent a majority of her time on two wheels exploring the city's stunning art scene and shops&mdash;including one that specializes in toothbrushes&mdash;and indulging in plenty of amazing local eats, from falafel to <em>stroopwafel</em> to potato sorbet.<em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/Amsterdam-Travel-Sketchbook">See the comic &raquo;</a></em>

        



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  • 08/05/13--10:30: Sacred Ground
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><small><b>From SAVEUR Issue #158</b></small><br>I drove nine miles past Heartland Farm before I realized I'd missed the place, as usual. The tiny (at least by Kansas standards) 80-acre farmstead is located, improbably, near Pawnee Rock&mdash;the exact epicenter of the heartland&mdash;in the middle of thousands upon thousands of acres of wheat, corn, soybeans, and cattle. Easy enough to miss, I suppose, in this vast sea of massive mono-cropped grids. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/Sacred-Ground">Keep reading &raquo;</a></em>

        



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  • 08/05/13--12:30: Oklahoma Rising
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><small><b>From SAVEUR Issue #158</b></small><br>At first glance, Oklahoma City's Ludivine appears to serve the type of familiar rib-sticking French bistro fare that sends diners all over America into food-induced comas: split beef bones with molten marrow and tomato jam; a croque tartine, a monster of a sandwich heavy with ham, b&eacute;chamel sauce, and bubbling cheese, topped with a fried egg. But the side salad for that croque is made with foraged dock and chickweed, which lend a refreshing bittersweet crunch. It's just one hint that this place is more complex than you might think. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/Ludivine-Oklahoma-City-Restaurant"... reading &raquo;</a></em>

        



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  • 08/07/13--08:15: Glory Road
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><p><strong>From SAVEUR Issue #158</strong><br />
    The pop culture personality of Route 66 never had much to do with food. The Joad family in John Steinbeck's <em>The Grapes of Wrath</em>, traveling down the "road of flight," barely could sustain themselves; in the song "(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66," songwriter Bobby Troup moves too fast to stop for a meal; and do you remember what, if anything, anybody ate in the TV show <em>Route 66</em>? <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/great-food-on-route-66">Keep reading &raquo;</a></em>

        



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    Come enjoy three full days of cooking seminars and demonstrations, culinary competitions, wine tastings, and more at the 28th Annual Lake Tahoe Autumn Food & Wine Festival September 6 – 8 in the Village at Northstar™. You won’t want to miss these NEW exciting, interactive, foodie seminars and events!

        



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  • 08/09/13--08:00: Mom and Populist
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><small><b>From SAVEUR Issue #158</b></small><br>Give the people what they want, thought Colby and Megan Garrelts when they opened Rye KC last winter in Leawood, Kansas. Being native Midwesterners themselves, the couple knew exactly what that meant: familiar, hearty fare in comfortable surroundings; a restaurant where friends, family, and co-workers could gather on school nights and break pork rinds together. But as award-winning chefs who also run the upscale Bluestem in Kansas City, the Garrelts had a reputation to uphold. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/Rye-KC-Kansas-City-Restaurant">Keep reading &raquo;</a></em>


        



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  • 08/16/13--09:00: Eating Well in Montreal
  • <!--smart_paging_filter-->Montreal is a city awash in good eats, from salted caramel and chocolate cr&ecirc;pes to smoked meat and fresh oysters. Chicago-based artist Sarah Becan drew up some of the amazing food she encountered on a recent trip, at landmarks such as the Chinese Quarter, the Jean-Talon Market, and the Boulevard Saint-Laurent. Check out her favorite spots&mdash;all 12 pages of them. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/montreal-travelogue">Read more &raquo;</a></em>


        







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  • 08/19/13--08:30: Golden Days
  • <!--smart_paging_filter--><small><b>From SAVEUR Issue #158</b></small><br>In my neurotic need not to be late, my partner Steven and I arrived at the Bordeaux train station hours early. We were on our way to nearby Eug&eacute;nie-les-Bains to splurge on the cooking of the great French chef Michel Gu&eacute;rard. I settled in a seat looking directly at a PAUL bakery kiosk selling our favorite baguettes. "Shall we get one for the train?" Steven asked. <em><a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/travels/golden-days-gael-greene">Keep reading &raquo;</a></em>


        







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  • 08/21/13--13:15: Big Pie Country
  • EnlargeCredit: James Roper As a young girl living in the suburbs of Los Angeles, I was an avid Little House on the Prairie fan. So perhaps it was inevitable I would marry a farm boy. Well, okay, a rancher—but close enough for me. My husband, Gentner Drummond, is the great-great-grandson of Frederick Drummond, who came to Oklahoma from Scotland in the 1880s. Family legend has it that he might have been escaping a conviction for murdering a competitor on the golf course—a story never verified but one we like to tell nonetheless. In 1911, Frederick's oldest son, R.C., started what would become a cattle dynasty on the ranch where Gentner and I—with the help of our ranch hands and children—now run a few thousand head on more than 20,000 acres of land.

    What I quickly learned is that there is no such thing as a "friendly" pie-baking contest around here
    Not long after I first got to know Gentner's family, I started hearing about a massive picnic hosted at the ranch by the men's club of the local Presbyterian church. From the 1950s through the 1970s, they invited fathers and sons from across the state to enjoy a day on a working cattle ranch and eat barbecued Drummond beef while surrounded by grassland as far as the eye could see. The people who told me about the picnic were not members of the Drummond family themselves but the little boys—now grown men—who had attended with their fathers, and for whom the event had made a lifetime impression. The longing I heard in their voices made me decide to rekindle the tradition. My idea was to invite all of our friends to the ranch for a potluck. I also figured—rather naively, it turns out—that we could host a friendly old-fashioned pie contest to boot. The first-place prize would be a hand-painted trophy. It would be fun.

     
     James Roper
    What I quickly learned is that there is no such thing as a "friendly" pie-baking contest around here. Those who bake, bake to win. The first year of the revived picnic, pie after pie arrived, filling tables to the point where they could accommodate nothing else. People from all walks of life—a waitress from the local diner, the CEO of an oil and gas company (who won the grand prize that year)—bent the ears of the judges for hours with impassioned stories of their pie-baking odysseys. Others tried to leverage favor for their entries with blatant flattery, heck, even bribery. And keeping the hungry hordes away from the pies was a challenge worthy of the Department of Homeland Security. By the time the judging started, several slices had already vanished.

    As our guests have multiplied over the years, the potluck scenario has gone by the wayside. Now more than ever, everyone is focused on one thing and one thing only: baking the winning pie. Peeking into the tent just before the judging began this year, I was dazzled by over 70 entries of all different kinds: apple pies fancied up with caramel or rosemary, silken pear and custard, mixed-fruit "razzleberry" pie, and more.

     
     James Roper
    To keep the crowd at bay while the judges, two chefs from Tulsa and a food magazine editor from New York, methodically tasted each competing pie, we served burgers, mac and cheese, and "cowboy caviar," a salad of hominy and black-eyed peas. But as soon as they'd sated themselves, our guests migrated back to watch the pie contest, awaiting the moment when they could all dig in. When the judges reached the entry that would win the grand-prize trophy—a bronzed pecan pie with a buttery crust and a luscious filling topped with perfectly arranged nuts, from former restaurant owner Rubyane Surritte—we could all tell. The judges' eyebrows lifted, and they all looked up from their plates at each other with expressions of surprise and satisfaction. Then it was time to serve the pies. In a blink of an eye, plates were full and contentment washed through the tent.

    A few days after our guests went home, we excitedly began to plan next year's picnic. Sometimes our neighbors ask why hundreds of city folk drive an hour or more to spend an afternoon in the country. My husband thinks it's the cattle and the long views. Me? I know it's the pie.

        







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